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Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies

The Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies Concentration and Major give students an opportunity to explore Latin America’s multiplicity of peoples and cultures as they are situated in historical and international contexts, including their new and centuries-old immigrant and migrant diasporas or pre-Anglo enclaves within the United States. Students select from a multidisciplinary array of courses that explore the diversity of the Hispanic, indigenous, Afro-Latin, and Portuguese-speaking peoples of the Americas as well as their common cultural and historical roots.


Students interested in Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies should consider enrolling in one of the courses listed under Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies on the First-Year Student website.

 

EDUC 169
Schooling in the United States
Common Area: None

This course is an introduction to the problems and possibilities of public schooling in the United States.  In it, students will consider big questions—questions about the purpose of school, about who should be educated, about what should be taught, and about the factors that constrain decision-making.  In order to get a range of perspectives on those questions, the course will utilize a number of disciplinary lenses—history, sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, etc.


HIST 127
Modern Latin America
Common Area: Cross-cultural Studies or Historical Studies

Surveys the history of 19th- and 20th-century Latin America, focusing on six countries. Topics include the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, the challenges of development and modernization, the Catholic church and liberation theology, social and political movements for reform or revolution, slavery, race relations, the social history of workers and peasants, and inter-American relations. Fulfills one non-Western requirement for the major.
 

MUSC 155
Musics of Latin America
Common Area: Arts

An introduction to the rich and varied musical traditions of Latin America, this course will explore a range of issues including social function, political context, literature, and religion as they assist in understanding music in and as culture.  We will study the musics of several regions without attempting a comprehensive survey. The focus will be on listening critically and appreciating music as a vehicle through which to understand culture and society. Lecture and discussion will feature audio and visual performances of many genres.  No prerequisite. One unit. 


SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish 2
Common Area: Language Studies

This course offers students with a more developed intermediate knowledge of Spanish (often 3-4 years of high-school Spanish) to consolidate language skills and continue to advance their ability to analyze and communicate in the language by writing compositions, making oral presentations, discussing cultural readings, and engaging in other interactive group activities. Includes a review of certain Spanish structures difficult for speakers of English. Students must complete the Spanish Background Questionnaire and the Placement exam online before enrolling in this course. Four classroom hours weekly (three hours with the professor and one additional hour of oral practice with a foreign language assistant).


SPAN 216
Directed Independent Intermediate Spanish 2
Common Area: Language Studies

This course offers an alternative approach to Intermediate Spanish 2 for students who work well independently and enjoy using technology. Students must complete the Spanish Background Questionnaire and the Placement exam online before enrolling in this course. Includes weekly oral practice with a foreign language assistant.


SPAN 301
Spanish Composition & Conversation
Common Area: Language Studies

Spanish Composition and Conversation is the first course in the Spanish major sequence.  It is typically recommended for students who have an AP Spanish Language score of 3 or higher and who are not native or heritage speakers of Spanish. A prerequisite for more advanced 300-level Spanish courses, this class provides intensive composition and conversation practice, with a focus on vocabulary building and grammatical feedback geared to students´ individual needs.  In addition to speaking and writing, the course also emphasizes listening, reading and the development of a better understanding of the Hispanic world. Class size is capped so that students have ample opportunity for practice and revision. Five classroom hours weekly (three hours with the professor and two additional hours of oral practice with a foreign language assistant). All students must complete the Spanish Background Questionnaire and, depending on their AP scores, the Placement exam online before enrolling in this course.


SPAN 302
Español para Hispanohablantes
Common Area: Language Studies

This course is designed for students who speak or hear Spanish at home and would like to improve their reading and writing skills. The equivalent of Spanish 301, this class counts for the Spanish major and is a prerequisite for more advanced Spanish classes. The course provides intensive reading and writing practice through the analysis and discussion of works by contemporary authors, as well as workshop-style creative writing assignments. Students must complete the Spanish Background Questionnaire online before enrolling in this course. Four classroom hours weekly (three hours with the professor and one hour of oral practice weekly with a foreign language assistant).


SPAN 305
Introduction to Textual Analysis
Common Area: Language Studies or Literature

An introduction to college-level textual analysis in Spanish, this course teaches close reading of selected drama, poetry, prose fiction, and cinema from Spain and Spanish America. Students must normally complete Spanish 301 or 302 before taking this course. However, in exceptional circumstances, highly advanced or native students may enroll directly after completing the Spanish Background Questionnaire and seeking the advice of the chair of Spanish. The course counts towards a Spanish major and is a prerequisite for other upper-level courses in the major.

 

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