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Requirements

Concentration

Students can choose between two concentration tracks: Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies or Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies /Social Justice.

Both tracks require the completion of the language requirement (see details below) plus six additional courses as detailed below.

Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies Track

  • One gateway course (LALC 101 Intro to The Latin American, Latinx and Caribbean Studies, HIST 126 Colonial Latin America, HIST 127 Modern Latin America, HIST 128 Latino History, ANTH 266 Culture & Politics in Latin America, POLS 251 Latin American Politics, POLS 200 US and Latin America, or a course with a broad focus on Latin America approved by the LALC Director).
  • Completion of five additional Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies courses, with no more than two per discipline, at least one of which must be in history*.

Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies/Social Justice

  • One gateway course (LALC 101 Intro to The Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies, HIST 126 Colonial Latin America, HIST 127 Modern Latin America, HIST 128 Latino History, ANTH 266 Culture & Politics in Latin America, POLS 251 Latin American Politics, POLS 200 US and Latin America, or a course with a broad focus on Latin America approved by the Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies director).
  • Completion of five additional Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies courses, with no more than two per discipline, at least one of which must be in history*.
  • Among the remaining four courses (since the fifth must be in history), students pursuing this track must complete one Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies course with a social justice focus; one Academic Internship in Worcester or Washington, D.C. dealing with the Latinx population or Latin American issues (Community-Based Learning and other experiential learning experiences may be considered as alternatives for the academic internship), and one CIS Senior Seminar on Social Justice. This latter course must be taken in the second semester of the student's senior year.

*In the case of courses taken in the Spanish department, THREE MAY be accepted if, and only if, one deals with art content, specifically SPAN 312, SPAN 420 and SPAN 399 (Creative Writing in Spanish).

Note: Up to three courses in Study Abroad programs in Latin America can be approved for Concentration credit. Only two courses with Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies topics can be applied to the concentration for students studying abroad in Spain.

Language Requirement

This requirement can be fulfilled by SPAN 202 or FREN 202. The language requirement does not count toward the multidisciplinary courses mentioned above, but language courses above the 202 level can be counted as fulfilling regular concentration requirements. Students proficient in Latin American languages can demonstrate the completion of the language requirement by taking higher than 202 level language courses or, in the case of Latin American languages not taught in the College, by seeking a proficiency test from faculty competent in that language.

Current Semester Courses

The Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies Major

The Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies major is one of the student-designed programs of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies. The major requirements are intended to encourage both breadth and depth of the study of Latin Americans and Latinx in a variety of disciplines.

Guidelines in Designing a Latin American, Latinx, and the Caribbean Studies Major

Requirements of the major:

  • Demonstrated language skills at 301 level (or a Latin American language native speaker skills). Students may include up to two language courses ABOVE the 301 level toward the major*.
  • A minimum of 10 courses as follows:
    • One gateway course: History 126, History 127, History 128, Anthropology 266, Political Science 251, Spanish 304 or an approved course with a broad focus on Latin America.
    • Four different courses from four different disciplines or programs (including Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies) at the 200 level, one must be in HIST.
    • Three advanced courses that focus on research and writing. These courses will vary by semester; some examples are: Anth 373: Culture and Human Rights, Educ 340: Multicultural Education, Hist 352: Rebels and Radical Thinkers, Hist 401: Popular Culture in Latin America, Hist 401: Afro-Latin American Religions, and Pols 326: Citizenship/Contemporary Latin America.

Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies Courses That Fulfill Major Requirement

This fulfills the “Three advanced courses that focus on research and writing” component of the major. 

Course No.

Course Title

ANTH 266

Culture and Politics of Latin America

EDUC 340

Multicultural Education

ECON 205

Economics of Development*

ECON 330

International Finance Econ 330*

SOCL 213

Race, Crime, and Justice

SOCL 299

Social movements and Social Change (course number will change when taught 2nd time)

ENGL 399

LatinX Literature (course number will change when taught 2nd time)

ENGL 399

Confrontations with Christianity (course number will change when taught 2nd time)

POLS 251

Latin American Politics

POLS 273

Race and Politics in the Americas

CISS 299

The United States and Latin America (will acquire a POLS designation when taught second time)

CISS 299

Latinx Politics (previously called Latino Political Identity; will acquire a POLS designation when taught second time)

CISS 399

Comparative Black Movements (will acquire a POLS designation when taught second time)

SPAN 305

Introduction to Textual Analysis

SPAN 407

Topics in Spanish and Spanish American Modern Poetry

SPAN 409

Topics in Colonial Spanish American Literature

SPAN 410

Topics: Literature of Exile, Immigration & Ethnicity

SPAN 420

Topics in Latin American Film

SPAN 450

Latinidades in Literature and Pop Culture

SPAN 366

Creative Writing in Spanish

RELS 290

Teologia Andina

RELS 299

Un tal Jesus (course number will change when taught 2nd time)

*These courses will be approved as fulfilling a LALC requirement only when students focus course assignments on LALC-related topics. Approval by the director, who will consult with instructor, is necessary.

Please note that course may fulfill more than one requirement. For instance, ANTH 266, POLS 251, CISS 299 (US and Latin America) may fulfill the Gateway requirement, may count as one of the four courses from four different departments at a 200 level, and the research and writing intensive requirement.

NOTE: In the case of courses taken in the Spanish department, THREE MAY be accepted if, and only if, one deals with art content, specifically SPAN 312, SPAN 420 and SPAN 399 (Creative Writing in Spanish). 

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I use Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies courses to satisfy common area requirements?
Yes. As a multidisciplinary concentration, Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies courses provide an excellent opportunity for comparing and contrasting varied disciplinary perspectives, which is one of the purposes of the common area requirements. While not all Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies courses carry common area designations, many of them do, especially in the following categories: Arts (A), Cross-Cultural Studies (C), Historical Studies (H), Literary Studies (L), Social Sciences (S).

Can I count courses in my major/s toward a Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies concentration?
Yes, although it is important to note that students are limited to two Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies courses in any given major. The rationale for the two-course limit is that Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies is a multidisciplinary concentration and, as such, students who complete only six courses need to demonstrate engagement with at least three distinct disciplines. For the same reason, students who major in more than one Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies-related discipline can count two courses from each of their majors.

Why are concentrators and majors required to take at least one course in history?
Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies faculty consider a grounding in the history of Latin American, Latinx, and the Caribbean communities to be fundamental to an understanding of the field.

Why is there a separate Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies language requirement?
Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies faculty also consider language study to be an integral part of the field. Courses taken at the elementary level do not fulfill the requirement because the ability to communicate orally and in writing on academic topics necessitates an advanced intermediate command of the language (202 level). The language requirement is counted separately from the six required multidisciplinary courses for concentrators and 10 for majors.

Is it possible to fulfill the Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies language requirement in a language other than Spanish?
 
Yes. Most concentrators complete the language requirement with Spanish 202 or French 202. However, these are not the only languages in use in Latin America and within Latinx communities in the U.S. Although Portuguese is not currently offered at Holy Cross, concentrators and majors can transfer advanced intermediate level credit from another accredited academic institution for this purpose. Others with a strong interest in indigenous or Afro-Latin communities can transfer college credits in Quechua, Nahuatl, one of the Mayan languages, Garifuna, etc., or apply to the Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies director for permission to accept evidence of competency in lieu of college-level coursework.

Why is Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies, LALC 101, recommended rather than required?
Since LALC 101 is typically offered only once every other semester, many students cannot fit it into their schedules. HIST 127 Modern Latin America, HIST 128 Latino History, ANTH 266 Culture & Politics in Latin America or POLS 251 Latin American Politics, are examples of courses that provide broad overviews of either Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies. Other courses with a broad focus on the field may be used to fulfill the requirement per the approval of the Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies director.

Can I count courses taken at other accredited institutions of higher education in the U.S. toward a Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies concentration or major?
Yes. You will need to apply through the Registrar's Office to transfer credit to Holy Cross, whether from another college or university in the U.S. or abroad. Be sure to indicate on your application that you want the course to count for Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies credit, so that the Registrar's Office can arrange for the requisite permissions to be processed.

Can I count courses taken abroad toward a Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies concentration or major?
Yes. Up to two courses can be applied toward the concentration for students studying abroad in Europe and up to three courses for students studying abroad in Latin America. Learn more semester and yearlong study abroad opportunities in Latin America.

I have already declared a concentration in Peace and Conflict Studies or Africana Studies. What do I need to do to declare a second concentration in Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies?
You declare your second concentration the same way you declared your first concentration.

When should I declare a concentration or major in Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies?
 
Whenever you feel ready to do so. Although most students declare the concentration or major during their sophomore year, it is possible to declare the concentration as a first-year student, junior, or senior.