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Sarah Klotz

klotz

 

English Department

Director, Rhetoric and Composition
Assistant Professor, English

Ph.D., The University of California, Davis

Fields: Rhetoric and Composition, Native American/Indigenous Studies, Writing Assessment, Early American Literature
 


Email: sklotz@holycross.edu
Office Phone: 508-793-3965
Office: Fenwick 210
Office Hours: W 3-5pm, and by appt.
Box: 47A

 

Biography

My research interests are rooted in understanding the role of literacy in American nation-building and using rhetorical theory as a lens to understand race and racialization in the United States. I have just finished a book on Native American students’ writing from the first off-reservation boarding school located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Before coming to Holy Cross, I was a professor of English at Butte College in Northern California, I directed a research center for equity in higher education at the University of Southern California, and I was a visiting professor of writing at Michigan State University. 

Classes

  • Introduction to Academic Writing 

  •  Intermediate Academic Writing

  •  Rhetoric

  •  Native American Expressive Traditions

Recent Work

Writing Their Bodies: Restoring Rhetorical Relations at the Carlisle Indian School  (Utah State University Press, 2021)

Between 1879 and 1918, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School housed over 10,000 students and served as a prototype for boarding schools on and off reservations across the continent. Writing Their Bodies analyzes pedagogical philosophies and curricular materials through the perspective of written and visual student texts created during the school’s first three-year term. Using archival and decolonizing methodologies, this book historicizes remedial literacy education and proposes new ways of reading Indigenous rhetorics to expand what we know about the Native American textual tradition. 

 “Contract Grading as Anti-Racist Praxis in the Community College Context.” Co-author Carl Whithaus. First Year Composition at the Community College: Empowering the TeacherBetsy Gilliland and Meryl Siegal eds. University of Michigan Press.  2021.

“Pictograph as Epitaph: Reading Algonquian Pictography in the Removal Period.” Early American Literature. 55.1 (Spring 2020): 177-207.

“The Historical Work of Cultural Rhetorics: Constellating Indigenous, Deaf, and English-Only Literacies.” constellations: a cultural rhetorics publishing space. 2 (Fall 2019). http://constell8cr.com/issue-2/the-historical-work-of-cultural-rhetorics-constellating-indigenous-deaf-and-english-only-literacies/

 “Impossible Rhetorics of Survivance at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1879-1883.” College Composition and Communication. 69.2 (December 2017): 208-229.

“Gloria Anzaldúa’s Rhetoric of Ambiguity and Anti-Racist Teaching.” Co-author Carl Whithaus. Composition Studies 43.2 (Fall 2015): 72-91.