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  Book Notes    
         
    All the Stars Came Out That Night
By Kevin B. King '68

All the Stars Came Out That Night (Dutton) by Kevin King '68 is a literary novel about "the greatest baseball game never (officially) played." Set in the 1930s, this mythic story is narrated by the late gossip columnist Walter Winchell. The tale depicts a vibrant portrait of Depression-era baseball, from its boozing and womanizing to its associations with racketeers and Hollywood stars. The climactic game, funded by Henry Ford and politically orchestrated by Clarence Darrow, is played at Fenway Park. It features Dizzy Dean's all-white team, made up of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and rookie Joe DiMaggio, versus Satchel Paige's Negro League all-stars, including Josh Gibson, Cool Papa Bell and Buck Leonard.

King is a published poet whose work has appeared in Ploughshares, The Threepenny Review and Prairie Schooner. He lives in Exeter, N.H., with his wife and son. This is his first novel.

 

All the Stars Came Out That Night

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Peril in the Powder Mills: Gunpowder and Its Men
By David H. McMahon '63 and Anne Kelly Lane

David McMahon '63 is co-author of Peril in the Powder Mills (Infinity Publishing), a chronicle of America's "Black Powder Era." Intertwined with the early expansion of our country, gunpowder played an integral role through the 19th century. This book provides overviews of leading powder companies, their roles in the Civil War, and the risks involved in powder making. Numerous powder labels, vintage photos, trade cards and gunpowder ads are presented throughout the book. McMahon's story will be of particular interest to Civil War buffs, historians, gun aficionados, game hunters and sporting collectors.

McMahon, who is a chemist, earned his Ph.D. at the University of New Hampshire. A presenter at national chemical conferences, he has published numerous articles in analytical chemistry journals. McMahon is the author of many historical articles and booklets.

  Peril in the Powder Mills: Gunpowder and Its Men
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Looking for Longleaf: The Fall and Rise of an American Forest
By Lawrence S. Earley '66

In Looking for Longleaf (University of North Carolina Press), Lawrence Earley '66 explores the longleaf pine forest—formerly the most extensive and biologically diverse ecosystem in North America. Out of the original 92 million acres of longleaf, fewer than three million remain today, threatening such species as the gopher tortoise, the red-cockaded woodpecker and the Venus flytrap. Drawing on extensive research, Earley tells his story through first-person travel accounts and interviews with biologists, botanists and landowners. He explains how recent collaborations between ecologists and foresters have brought new hope that, with continued human commitment, the longleaf pine may flourish once again.

A photographer as well as a writer, Earley is a former editor of Wildlife in North Carolina magazine; he resides in Raleigh, N.C.
  Looking for Longleaf: The Fall and Rise of an American Forest
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Broken: The Troubled Past and Uncertain Future of the FBI
By Richard Gid Powers '65

In his book, Broken (Free Press), Richard Gid Powers '65 answers the controversial question: Why did the FBI fail to protect the country from the 9/11 attacks? The answer, he asserts, is a result of the FBI's "risk aversion culture." Fearful of being criticized for infringing on civil liberties, the FBI avoids any activity that could result in opposition from the American people. Powers writes that the bureau has abandoned its original mission—to pursue the most dangerous threats to the nation—to address less contentious crimes. According to Booklist, "as a history of the nation's most powerful law enforcement agency, this work is informative and engrossing."

Professor of history at CUNY Graduate Center and the College of Staten Island in New York, Powers is the author of many books, including the biography, Secrecy and Power: The Life of J. Edgar Hoover.

  Broken: The Troubled Past and Uncertain Future of the FBI
   

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An Introduction to the Catholic Charismatic Renewal
By John J. Boucher '70 and Therese Boucher

John Boucher '70 and his wife, Therese, are  co-authors of An Introduction to the Catholic Charismatic Renewal (Servant Publications), an informative pamphlet that explains this significant renewal movement. The booklet covers how the renewal has developed through conferences, prayer groups and communities, and how it is transforming parish life today. The Bouchers draw upon the book, Fanning the Flame, by Rev. Kilian McDonnell and Rev. George Montague, to place the renewal at the heart of the Church.

Boucher is director of the Office of Parish Life, Evangelization Ministry for the Diocese of Trenton, N.J. His many publications include Christian Marriage: Sacrament of Abiding Friendship and Following Jesus: A Disciple's Guide to Discerning God's Will. The Bouchers live in Princeton, N.J.

 

An Introduction to the Catholic Charismatic Renewal

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Unfinished Business
By Diana Beard-Williams '76

Unfinished Business (Llumina Press), by Diana Beard-Williams '76, is a tale of politics, infidelity, vengeance and family secrets. Set in Washington, D.C., in 1960, the book tells the story of Larry Edwards, a man trapped in a suffocating marriage and disillusioned by a business system that fails to see past the color of his skin. Suddenly, Edwards sets off a chain of events that creates an intriguing life's journey for his infant daughter, Regina, and 17-year-old sister-in-law, Rosa. Along their way, the cast of characters enriches, challenges and defines the true meaning of friendship, commitment and compromise. Beard-Williams presents an up-close and personal look at both the joy and pain people inflict on one another in the name of love.

A public speaker, consultant and public relations professional, Beard-Williams' columns on socioeconomic, political and educational issues have appeared in numerous publications, including the Los Angeles Times. She lives in California with her husband and two sons.

  Unfinished Business
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Alibi
By Stephen M. Murphy '77

Alibi (Jove), by Stephen Murphy '77, is a legal thriller set in Manchester, N.H. Lawyer Dutch Francis, known for defending people accused of driving while intoxicated, is enlisted by a boyhood friend to assist with a murder case. Francis accepts the challenge and takes the case of a troubled young man accused of killing the local high school football star. The further he gets involved in the investigation, however, the more he is convinced of his client's innocence—and the more he gets manipulated. In this suspenseful story, we quickly learn that all is not what it should be, and Francis soon discovers some disconcerting facts about his friend.

Murphy, a practicing civil litigator, is an officer of the San Francisco Trial Lawyers Association and editor in chief of its Trial Lawyer magazine. He was recently named by the San Francisco Recorder as one of the city's top plaintiff's employment attorneys.

  Alibi
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Critical Companion to Tennessee Williams: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work
By Alycia Smith-Howard '89 and Greta Heintzelman

Alycia Smith-Howard '89 is co-author of Critical Companion to Tennessee Williams (Facts on File), a reference book about one of the greatest American dramatists of the 20th century. Known for his sensitive characterizations, ironic humor and depiction of harsh realities in relationships, Williams drew on his own troubled life to depict the loneliness, fear and sexual anxiety of his memorable characters. This book includes entries on all of Williams' major and most of his minor works. In addition, it cites places and events related to his works, major figures in his life, and issues in criticism on Williams. Library Journal describes the book as, "a one-stop resource for Tennessee Williams scholars ... stands out for the breadth of its coverage, its focus on the writer's work, and its user-friendly format."

Assistant professor at the Gallatin School at New York University, Smith-Howard earned her Ph.D. at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, England. She is the artistic director of the Gallatin Arts Festival.

  Critical Companion to Tennessee Williams: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work
   

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