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  Book Notes    
         
   

Assumption College: A Centennial History, 1904-2004
by Kenneth J. Moynihan ’66

Assumption College: A Centennial History, 1904-2004 ( Assumption College), by Kenneth J. Moynihan ’66 is a narrative of the “triumphs and tragedies” of a unique educational institution. Created to train French-speaking boys from New England who aspired to become priests, the school was founded by the Augustinians of the Assumption just after the turn of the last century. Chronicling the college’s evolution, Moynihan recounts a rich assortment of challenges and achievements that led to today’s Assumption–including the deadly tornado of 1953 that ravaged the campus.

Moynihan is professor of history and chair of the history department at Assumption College. A 1962 graduate of Assumption Preparatory School, he earned his Ph.D. from Clark University. The author of numerous articles in professional journals, he writes a weekly column for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.

 

Assumption College: A Centennial History, 1904-2004

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A Kindred Orphanhood: Selected Poems of Sergey Gandlevsky
by Phil Metres ’92

Phil Metres ’92 is the translator of A Kindred Orphanhood: Selected Poems of Sergey Gandlevsky (Zephyr Press). Commenting on the collection, poet David Wojahn writes, “We can be grateful to Philip Metres for having introduced English-speaking readers to the astringent and unflappable poems of Sergey Gandlevsky.” Critic Andrei Codrescu concurs, noting, “(these) superb translations that uncannily make the Russian ours.”

Metres’ poems and translations of Russian poets have appeared in numerous journals and in the anthologies Best American Poetry (2002) and In the Grip of Strange Thoughts: Russian Poetry in a New Era (Zephyr, 1999). His translation, with Tatiana Tulchinsky, of Catalogue of Comedic Novelties: Selected Poems of Lev Rubinshtein, was published last year. Primer for Non-Native Speakers, a chapbook of Metres’ own poetry, is available from Kent State University Press. The recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Ledig House and Indiana University , he teaches at John Carroll University in University Heights, Ohio.

  A Kindred Orphanhood: Selected Poems of Sergey Gandlevsky
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A Catholic in the White House?
by Tom Carty ’91

Tom Carty ’91 is the author of A Catholic in the White House? (Palgrave MacMillan), a detailed study that challenges the conventional wisdom that John F. Kennedy’s election to the presidency in 1960 put an end to religious and political tensions between American Catholics and Protestants. “A Catholic in the White House? is the first comprehensive scholarly examination of the ‘Catholic issue’ in the 1960 election,” writes David J. O’Brien, Loyola Professor of Roman Catholic Studies at Holy Cross. “Carty provides a rich historical context, then explores the role of evangelical and mainstream Protestants, political liberals, and Catholics as they confronted the Kennedy candidacy and campaign. His treatment of the campaign includes original in-depth examination of the vote in key states. This is an important, timely book which deserves attention from everyone interested in American politics.”

Carty is an assistant professor of history and American studies at Springfield ( Mass.) College.

  A Catholic in the White House?
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Coleridge and Newman: The Centrality of Conscience
by Rev. Philip C. Rule, S.J.

Coleridge and Newman: The Centrality of Conscience (Fordham University Press), by Rev. Philip C. Rule, S.J., seeks to show why Samuel Taylor Coleridge and John Henry Newman belong in the long line of Christian apologists who, through the ages, have tried to find a foundational philosophy for the doctrines and practices of revealed religion. The book focuses on the interplay between religious experience and rhetorical expression. It documents clearly, for the first time, Coleridge’s influence on Newman.

A professor of English at the College, Fr. Rule has published widely in the areas of 19 th-century British studies, film studies, and religion and literature.

  Coleridge and Newman: The Centrality of Conscience
   

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