You are here

Fall 2017 Events

The following list of programs engages questions about diversity, inclusion, and contemporary social issues to further deepen dialogue and contemplation. Please remember that dates, times and locations may change. Please refer to the College's Events Calendar for the most up-to-date information!

The College is committed to providing accessible programs and events. If you need any accommodations, please visit the College's Events Calendar to determine program organizers, and contact them directly. Advance notice is appreciated.

Download a print version of this calendar.

 

August 30 & 31
#FirstGenCollegeGrad Campaign

#FirstGenCollegeGrad is an awareness campaign to help first generation college students on our campus more easily identify faculty and staff who are able to help guide them through their time on campus. The purpose is to encourage students to engage with faculty and staff based on similar lived experiences.

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

Thursday, September 7
2-4 pm, Hogan 402/3
7 C's of Social Change Part 1

For Holy Cross Community. In this session we will be exploring individual values; consciousness of self, congruence of values to action, and committment to positive social change through experiential learning, skill building and practice. Additional workshops on Sept. 26 & Oct. 31.***

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

Monday, September 11
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Richard Rothstein, a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and author of "The Color of Law," explains how residential segregation was created by racially explicit and unconstitutional government policy in the mid-20th century. Rothstein argues that only after learning the history of this policy can we undertake the national conversation necessary to fix it.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture

 

Thursday, September 14
4:30-7 pm, Loyola Ballroom
Poverty Simulation

For Holy Cross Community. Do you have what it takes to live a month in Poverty? As people in the Holy Cross community, we strive to help others, to be with others, and to support others. How can this be with a limited understanding of who the "other" is? This simulation will be the first step for many in truly understanding what it means to stand in solidarity with people in the midst of poverty. This simulation aims to uncover of those who live on and/or below the poverty level, better enablling us in the Holy Cross Community to live the mission. DINNER WILL BE SERVED! Look for registration email.***

Sponsored by: Multicultural Peer Education

 

September 17-23
HCF1RST Awareness Wee
k
A week of programming around first generation college students. ***

Sponsored by: HCF1RST Scholars


September 18-24
International Week of the Deaf

Sponsored by: American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Program

 

Monday, September 18
5-6:30 pm, Location TBD
Silent Dinner

Sponsored by: American Sign Language/Deaf Studes Program

 

Tuesday, September 19
6-7 pm, Smith Hall 201
Community-based Classics

"Community-based Classics? the rewards and challenges of teaching Latin as service-learning" by Elizabeth Butterworth of the Paideia Institute

Sponsored by: Classics Department

 

Wednesday, September 20
2:30-4:30 pm, Hogan 402/03
Creating An Inclusive Campus: Skills & Practice

A faculty and staff workshop. Participants will develop the skills to be active bystanders & effective allies to historically marginalized communities. Additional date: November 6.***

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity & Inclusion

 

Wednesday, September 20
4:30-6 pm, Rehm Library
Alcohol Education Fishbowl

For Holy Cross Community. A fishbowl discussion on Alcohol and Addiction featuring members of the Holy Cross community.

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education and Office of Wellness Programming

 

Wednesday, September 20
7-9 pm, Hogan 519
Race, the power of an illusion Part 1

For Holy Cross Community. Part 1 – “The Difference Between Us” examines how scientific discoveries have toppled the concept of biological race. The program follows a dozen diverse students who sequence and compare their own DNA. They discover, to their surprise, that their closest genetic matches are as likely to be with people from other “races” as their own. The episode helps us understand why it doesn’t make scientific or genetic sense to sort people into biological races, as it dismantles our most basic myths about race, including natural superiority and inferiority. Additional discussion on Oct. 5 & Nov. 10.

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

September 25-29
Hogan Lobby Table 1
Ally Awareness Week

Sponsored by: Pride

 

Monday, September 25
10 am -1 pm, Hogan 401
Understanding Gender and Sexuality Diversity Training

A workshop to increase awareness, support, and knowledge of gender and sexuality diversity. This workshop requires registration. Additional date: Nov. 9. A link to register will be sent via email.***

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultrual Education

 

Tuesday, September 26
2-4 pm, Hogan 320
7 C's of Social Change Part 2

For Holy Cross Community. In this session we will be exploring group process values; collaboration, common purpose and controversy with civility through experiential learning, skill building and practice. Additional workshop Oct. 31.***

Sponsored by: Offic eof Multicultural Education

 

Tuesday, September 26
6-8 pm, Hogan Ballroom
Deaf, Deaf World

Sponsored by: American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Program

 

Wednesday, September 27
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
Reel and Real Latinx Lives Matter

Dr. Aldama will unzip his brain, offering a multimedia extravaganza of all things Latinx in the 21st century. This includes an exploration of contemporary mainstream film, TV, music, animation, comic books, video games that simplifies and straightjackets Latinx identity and experience. He contrasts this with today’s abundance of Latinx created cultural phenomena that vitally complicates and enriches our understanding of Latinx identity and experience. Along the way Dr. Aldama presents a dynamic model for understanding Latinx subjects as active transformers of the world we live in today.

Sponsored by: Latin American and Latino Studies (Co-sponsored by: Dinand Library and English Department)

 

Wednesday, September 27
4:30 pm, Smith Labs 154
Anticolonial Lawyering, Postwar Human Rights, and Decolonization in Africa

Speaker: Meredith Terretta, Gordon F. Henderson Research Chair in Human Rights from the University of Ottawa.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies (Co-sponsored by: Gender, Sexuality, & Women’s Studies, History Department, International Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, Political Science Department)

 

Wednesday, September 27
5:45-6:45 pm, Spillane Pavilion outside of Smith Labs 154
Africana Studies Kickoff Reception

Africana Studies Kickoff Reception (featuring Fatima's famous samosas)

Sponsored by: Africana Studies

 

Thursday, September 28
7:30-9 pm, The Hub
Breaking Barriers Questions

The MPEs will be available to facilitate the answering of questions submitted throughout the month at locations in Hogan 1, Kimball Dining Hall and questions submitted to mpe@holycross.edu as well as discuss current events related to human relations. Additional date: Oct. 26.

Sponsored by: Multicultural Peer Edcuation

 

Sunday, October 1
2 pm, Mary Chapel
Antigone in Ferguson

What happens when personal conviction and state law clash, and violence ensues? In this groundbreaking social justice project by Theater of War Productions, a dramatic reading of scenes from Sophocles’ Antigone by acclaimed stage and screen actors serves to help bridge the growing divide between law enforcement and local communities across the US. Holy Cross choristers join members of a community choir from Ferguson, MO, where the project originated following the police killing of Michael Brown, performing the choruses of Antigone set to gospel music.

Sponsored by: Arts Transcending Borders

 

Monday, October 2
4:30 pm, Hogan 320
Panel Discussion, "Latinx Identity; Many Narratives"

Panel discussion on the multiple narratives associated with identifying as "Latinx." Panelists are Maritza Cruz, Director of Racial & Gender Equity for the YWCA of Central MA, Leo Negron-Cruz, Program Coordinator at the Edward M. Kennedy Health Center, master trainer in HIV/AIDS & LGBTQQIP+ issues, and Juan Gomez, President & CEO of CENTROS, former Worcester City Councillor.

Sponsored by: Multicultural Peer Education (Co-sponsored by: Latin American Students Organization)

 

Monday, October 2
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
Our Lady of the Slaves: Marian Devotion in Cuba, Race and Revolution

Jalane Schmidt, associate professor of religious studies at University of Virginia and author of “Chachita’s Streets: The Virgin of Charity, Race, and Revolution in Cuba” (Duke University Press, 2015) will explore the role of Cuba’s patron saint, the Virgin of Charity of El Cobre — also known as Chachita, in contemporary Cuban culture.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture

 

Tuesday, October 3
12:30 pm, Hogan Suite A
Lunch Discussion: Public History and Activism in the Age of the Alt-Right

UVA Professor Jalane Schmidt will reflect on her involvement in alt-right resistance in Charlottesville, Virginia. RSVP by September 26: https://goo.gl/forms/04uSo4cPpITSBgVw1

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture

 

Wednesday, October 4
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
Dare We Hope for Common Ground?

In her book "Hope for the Common Ground: Mediating the Personal and the Political in a Divided Church," Julie Hanlon Rubio, Professor of Christian Ethics at St. Louis University, suggests that there is a way beyond red versus blue for orthodox and progressive Catholics. Despite their differences, Catholics across the political spectrum can share responsibility for social sin and work within communities to contribute to social progress. Rubio expands this common space into in-depth discussions on family fragility, poverty, abortion, and end-of-life care.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture

 

Wednesday, October 4
6 pm, Hogan Suite B/C
The Intersections of our Jesuit Mission, Social Justice, and Service: A Conversation with Fr. Campbell

Participate in a conversation with Fr. Bill Campbell, Vice President for Mission & Identity, on how our Jesuit mission guides us towards justice.

Sponsored by: Donelan Office of Community-Based Learning (Co-sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education and Student Programs for Urban Development)

 

Thursday, October 5
7-9 pm, Hogan 519
Race, the power of an illusion Part 2

Part 2 “The Story We Tell” uncovers the roots of the race concept, including the 19th-century science that legitimated it and the hold it has gained over our minds. It’s an eye-opening tale of how america’s need to defend slavery in the face of a radical new belief in freedom and equality led to a full-blown ideology of white supremacy. Noting the experience of Cherokee Indians, the U.S. war against Mexico and annexation of the Philippines, the film shows how definitions of race excluded from humanity not only Black people, but anyone who stood in the way of american expansion. The program traces the transformation of tentative suspicions about difference into a "common-sense" wisdom that people used to explain everything from individual behavior to the fate of whole societies, an idea of race that persists to this day.

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

October 13-14
10 am - 8 pm, Loyola Ballroom
Social Justice Engagement Institute

An opportunity to engage in thoughtful, deep reflection on the intersectionality of identity, social justice and personal,group, and institutional action! Look for registration via email.***

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

Monday, October 16
5-8 pm, Location TBD
Silent Dinner/ASL Mass

Sponsored by: American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Program

 

Tuesday, October 17
7:30 pm, Robert R. Jay Performing Arts Center (Saint John’s High School, Shrewsbury, MA)
Cie Hervé Koubi: Barbarian Nights

An exceptional all-male company of Algerian and West African dancers versatile in martial arts, capoeira, contemporary and street dance idioms, Cie Hervé Koubi invites us to encounters with cultures of the Mediterranean.

Sponsored by: Arts Transcending Borders

 

Wednesday, October 18
7:30 pm, Rehm Library

Author Reading – Adrian LeBlanc
McArthur Recipient, Adrian LeBlanc, is best known for her 2003 nonfiction book Random Family: Love, Drugs, Trouble, and Coming of Age in the Bronx, which chronicles the struggles of two young women as they deal with love, growing families, and prison time.

Sponsored by: Creative Writing Program

 

Thursday, October 19
6-9 pm, Hogan Hoval
Coming Out Coffee House

An open mic space for LGBTQIA individuals to tell their coming out stories.

Sponsored by: Outfront and Pride

 

October 19-21
Rehm Library
Rethinking the Afropolitan: The Ethics of Black Atlantic Masculinities on Display - Conference

The recent proliferation of images, articles, and even a Guinness commercial about Congolese men known as sapeurs (the Society of ambiance-Makers and Elegant People) raises new ethical questions about how we read race, gender, and identity in images and texts. Sapeurs appear to be the epitome of the "black dandy." However, these extravagantly dressed men also engage in friendly fashion competitions and do so against bleak West Central African urban landscapes. This conference aims to examine the intersections of gender, race, and visual culture, in the Atlantic, spanning Africa, the americas, the Caribbean, and Europe from the 16th century to the present.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies (Co-sponsored by: Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture)

 

Thursday, October 19
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
Keynote address: Silvio Torres-Saillant, Syracuse University

First keynote address for “Rethinking the Afropolitan” conference.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies (Co-sponsored by: Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture)

 

Thursday, October 19 - December 15
Cantor Art Gallery

The Cantor Art Gallery will mount a two-person exhibition in conjunction with the "Rethinking the Afropolitan" conference.

Making Visual the Music of Ismael Rivera
Photographs by Christopher Lopez. Lopez’s recent photographs, taken recently in Puerto Rico, focus on the imagery laden music of one of Puerto Rico’s most beloved musicians of the 20th century.

S.A.P.E.: Societe des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Elegantes/ Society of Tastemakers and Elegant People
Photographs by Héctor Mediavilla. Mediavilla, who lives and works in Spain, produced this series of photographs of Congolese men who have, since the early part of the 20th century, dressed as elegant French men for show and display. Known as Sapeurs, these men consider themselves artists, adding glamour to their humble environment through their refined manners and impeccable dressing styles.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies and Cantor Art Gallery

 

Friday, October 20
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
Keynote address: Robert Trent Vinson, College of William and Mary

Second keynote address for “Rethinking the Afropolitan” conference.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies (Co-sponsored by: Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture)

 

Friday, October 20
8 pm, Hogan Ballroom
Tribute to Ismael Rivera: An Afro-Caribbean Icon

At the height of his career in the 1970s, Puerto Rican singer Ismael Rivera shared the stage with salsa greats such as Benny Moré, Tito Puente and Celia Cruz, and revolutionized tropical music with his unique singing style and improvisational skills. Today, he is lionized in various Afro-Caribbean communities as a bastion of cultural nationalism and Pan-Africanism. Composer, arranger and multi-instrumentalist Gonzalo Grau breathes new life into Ismael Rivera hits in new arrangements for a stellar ensemble, including Worcester's own Manolo Mairena. In conjunction with the conference “Rethinking the Afropolitan: The Ethics of Black Atlantic Masculinities on Display,” Oct. 19-21

Sponsored by: Arts Transcending Borders (Co-sponsored by: Africana Studies, Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture)

 

Saturday, October 21
10 am - 10 pm, Loyola Ballroom
Day-long Conference on "Redefining Masculinity"

The gathering of college-age males in the Greater Worcester area to discuss the two exteremes of "Hyper-Masculinity to the Feminization of Males" in regards to the concept of "Redefining Masculinity".

Sponsored by: Male Involvement Coalition (Co-sponsored by: Men of Color Athletes)

 

Monday, October 23
7 pm, Hogan Ballroom
Platanos Y Collard Greens

Sponsored by: Latin American Students Organization

 

Wednesday, October 25
2-3:30 pm, Stein 216
Workshop with noted Chilean filmmaker, Prof. David Miranda Hardy

Sponsored by: Latin American and Latino Studies (Co-sponsored by: Spanish Department)

 

Thursday, October 26
7:30-9 pm, The Hub
Breaking Barriers Questions

The MPEs will be available to facilitate the answering of questions submitted throughout the month at locations in Hogan 1, Kimball Dining Hall and questions submitted to mpe@holycross.edu as well as discuss current events related to human relations.

Sponsored by: Multicultural Peer Education

 

Saturday, October 28
6 pm, Loyola Ballroom
BSU Family Fish Fry Gathering

A time to "break bread" and enjoy good people, good conversation, good music, and great food!

Sponsored by: Black Student Union

 

Saturday, October 28
ALANA/International Student Brunch

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

Tuesday, October 31
2-4 pm, Hogan 320
7 C's of Social Change

An exploration of group process values; collaboration, common purpose and controversy with civility through experiential learning, skill building and practice. ***

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

November, Dates TBD *UPDATE: UNITY WEEK HAS BEEN MOVED TO MARCH 19-23. EVENT DETAILS WILL BE PROVIDED SPRING SEMESTER.*
Unity Week

In conjunction with the conference “Rethinking the Afropolitan: The Ethics of Black Atlantic Masculinities on Display,” Oct. 19-21

Sponsored by: Student Government Association

 

Wednesday, November 1
4:30-6 pm, Rehm Library
Alan Rosen on Jewish Religious Life & Practice During the Holocaust

Alan Rosen, Kraft-Hiatt scholar-in-residence, will give a talk titled, "Out of the Depths: Jewish Religious Life and Practice During and After the Holocaust." In the talk, Rosen will explore the complex and difficult process for religious Jews to make sense of the world during the Holocaust, and to find meaning in its aftermath. Rosen is a renowned scholar of Holocaust literature, a lecturer at Yad Vashem, and a fellow at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture

 

Thursday, November 2
8 pm, Hogan Ballroom
Hanify-Howland Lecture

The lecture series recognizes individuals who have distinguished themselves in the realm of public service, and is named in honor of Edward Hanify, a member of the graduating class of 1904, and Weston Howland. Read more about previous speakers on the Hanify Howland webpage.

 

Friday, November 3
6:30-9 pm, Hogan Ballroom
BSU Griot

This annual program celebrates the tradition of African Story-telling to convey wisdom, history, human foibles, and entertainment. This year we will have the Bamidele Dancers & Drummers, the Holy Cross Spoken Word Team, and featuring spoken word artist, Akeem Lloyd, founder of L.I.F.T. , (Lifting Individual Futures Together)

Sponsored by: Black Student Union

 

Monday, November 6
7:30 pm, Rehm Library
Anti-Semitism on the Internet

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz is a former Google data scientist and author of "Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are" (HarperCollins, 2017).

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture

 

Tuesday, November 7
6 pm, Seelos
Luis Argueta's screening of his film The U Turn (2017)

It narrates the transformational journey of the immigrant workers who broke the silence about the abuses they endured at the Agriprocessors meatpacking plant in Postville, Iowa. The film also portrays some of the community members who experienced the life-changing effects of walking along with the immigrant workers. The film showcases the U visa, an immigration relief program which was passed as part of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Postville, Iowa is where most U visas have been obtained for victims of violent crimes - including child laborers - in a workplace context. This was the result of a courageous group of women and child workers losing their fear and collaborating with authorities in reporting their aggressors, while receiving invaluable community support.

Sponsored by: Montserrat Global Cluster (Co-sponsored by: Latin American and Latino Studies and Spanish Department)

 

Wednesday, November 8
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
The Human Consequences of Anti-LGBTQ policies: Experiences of LGBTQ Asylum Seekers

The event will feature Dr. Kapya John Kaoma, a Zambian scholar, pastor, and human rights activist with extensive publication on anti-gay legislation in Africa, Pastor Judy of Hadwen Park Church/LGBT Asylum Task Form, and a Worcester-based asylum seeker.

Sponsored by: Peace and Conflict Studies (Co-sponsored by: Africana Studies & Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies)

 

Thursday, November 9
4-7 pm, Hogan 401
Understanding Gender and Sexuality Diversity Training

A workshop to increase awareness, support, and knowledge of gender and sexuality diversity. This workshop requires registration. A link to register will be sent via email.***

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

Thursday, November 9
5:30-7:30 pm, Campion House
Sustaining Ourselves: Couragous Self-Care for Student Activists

Social justice activists often experience burn out. This interactive workshop will help participants understand the importance of self-care, while also building the skills to develop meaningful and sustainable self-care practices. By utilizing a confidential and safe space, participants will be able to share challenges and successes in the service of supporting and empowering each other. Workshop is for students, who should RSVP ahead of time.

Co-sponsored by the Counseling Center, Office of the College Chaplains, Office Diversity & Inclusion, Office of Multirucltural Eduation, & Office of Student Involvement

 

 

Friday, November 10
7-9 pm, Hogan 519
Race, the power of an illusion Part 3

For Holy Cross Community. Part 3 – “The House We Live In” focuses not on individual behaviors and attitudes, but on how our institutions shape and create race, giving different groups vastly unequal life chances. Who defines race? In the early 20th century, the courts were called upon to determine who was white, employing contradictory logic to maintain the color line. After World War II, government policies and subsidies helped create segregated suburbs where Italians, Jews and other not-quite-white European ethnics were able to reap the full advantages of whiteness. The episode reveals some of the ordinary social institutions.

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

Monday, November 13
5-8 pm, Location TBD
Silent Dinner/ASL Mass

Sponsored by: American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Program

 

Monday, November 13
4:30 pm, Rehm Library
Make America White Again? The Racial Reasoning of American Nationalism

Lecture by Prof. Matt Hughey (U. Conn.). From one perspective, the twists and turns of the American Odyssey of race and racism appears paradoxical and hypocritical. Practices of racial discrimination collide with high-minded Enlightenment idealism, whether in consideration of Supreme Court cases, the cultural mores of national belonging, school admission policies, or even presidential elections. For many, the American racial landscape appears full of pitfalls and puzzles and is anything but consistent or uniform. However, a sociological evaluation of “race” as a practice of social domination reveals a robust and consistent national logic.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies (Co-sponsored by: Latin American and Latino Studies, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Sociology and Anthropology Department)

 

Tuesday, November 14
4 pm, Rehm Library
Consuming Skin: On Race, Beauty, and War

Scholars have often explained the growth of luxury markets worldwide by pointing to the spread of capitalism, the engine that can at once circulate goods, increase people’s purchasing power, and drive their consumer desires. In this project, Prof. Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu (New York University) examines the consumption of cosmetics, particularly skincare products and practices in the U.S. and Vietnam, and show how the consumption of these goods has relied both on the forms of growth and development enabled by market liberalization and on the histories of loss and devastation wrought by war. 

Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program

 

November 15-17
Rehm Library
Conference: Religion, Protest and Social Upheaval

The recent proliferation of social, political, and economic protest and populist expression, from Black Lives Matter to Hindu Nationalism, invites renewed exploration of religion's age-old power to fuel and shape cultural change. This conference brings together a diverse group of scholars across national and religious divides to examine the impact of religion on various social and political movements. Organized around six themes — nationalism, immigration, race, gender, ecological concern, and economics — the conference aims to illuminate the complex dynamics of religion in protest and social upheaval.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture (Co-sponsored by: Religious Studies)

 

Wednesday, November 29
6-7 pm, Hogan 406
CBL Dialogue Session: "Where do we go from here? Living a Life of Service and Justice”

Recent alumni will share their stories of integrating service and social justice into their lives after Holy Cross.

Sponsored by: Donelan Office of Community-Based Learning

 

Friday, December 1
3:30 pm, Rehm Library
A Radical Solution to the Race Problem

Quayshawn Spencer, assistant professor of philosophy at University of Pennsylvania, focuses on metaphysical problems in race theory, such as whether any folk racial classification divides people into real biological groups.

Sponsored by: Philosophy Department (Co-sponsored by: Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture)

 

*** Registration required. More information to follow via campus emails.

 

FALL 2017: DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE PROGRamMING SPONSORS
Africana Studies, American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Program, Arts Transcending Borders, Black Student Union, Cantor Art Gallery, Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Classics Department, Dinand Library, Donelan Office of Community-Based Learning, English Department, Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, HCF1RST Scholars, History Department, Human Resources, International Studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, Latin American Students Organization, Male Involvement Coalition, McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture, Men of Color Athletes, Montserrat, Multicultural Peer Education, Outfront, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Office of Multicultural Education, Office of Wellness Programming, Peace and Conflict Studies, Philosophy Department, Political Science, President's Office, Pride, Religious Studies Department, Sociology & Anthropology Department, Spanish Department, Student Government Association, Student Programs for Urban Development