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Diversity and Inclusion Events

Spring 2018

The following list of programs engages questions about diversity, inclusion, and contemporary social issues to further deepen dialogue and contemplation. Please remember that dates, times and locations may change. Please refer to the College's Events Calendar for the most up-to-date information!

The College is committed to providing accessible programs and events. If you need any accommodations, please visit the College's Events Calendar to determine program organizers, and contact them directly. Advance notice is appreciated.

Download a print version of this calendar. (coming soon)

Monday, January 29
3:30-5 PM, Hogan Suite A
3rd Annual MLK Book Read: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is excited to announce the 3rd annual MLK Winter Book Read. The selected book is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity and Inclusion


Monday, January 29
4:30 - 6PM, Hogan 519
Sex, Power and Culture

Campus Conversations: Social Justice and Solidarity - How Then Shall We Live? is  a four part series aimed to address complex societal issues impacting our sense of identity, security, and freedom. These dialogues continue the larger conversations happening at both national and international levels around social movements, social media, and economic/political turmoil.The goal of the series is to offer an informative, balanced, and multi-perspective response to the issues addressed by inviting members of the campus community and external community to speak from their personal and/or professional viewpoint. The panels will include a combination of students, faculty, alumni, activists, and civic leaders. Being guided by our Jesuit values and principles, what is our obligation and responsibility as we teach, mentor, model, and inspire our students to live lives of service and leadership?

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education


Tuesday, January 30
11-12:30 PM, Hogan Suite A
3rd Annual MLK Book Read: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is excited to announce the 3rd annual MLK Winter Book Read. The selected book is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity and Inclusion


Wednesday, January 31
5:30-7 PM, Hogan Suite A
3rd Annual MLK Book Read: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is excited to announce the 3rd annual MLK Winter Book Read. The selected book is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity and Inclusion


Thursday, February 1
4:30 PM and 6:40 PM
Understanding Gender and Sexuality Diversity Training
A workshop to increase awareness, support, and knowledge of gender and sexuality diversity. Additional Dates: March 1 and April 10 ***

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education


February Friday 2 - Saturday 3
Friday, 5-9 PM, Saturday, 10 am - 5 PM,
Social Justice Engagement Institute, "The BLUEPRINT; Strategies for successful Social Justice Movements!"

This conference will explore the failings and successes of the major social justice movements of the 21st Century. We will also look at the foundational difference "strategy" plays in developing a successful movement. Our guest speakers include Fr. Rick Malloy, S.J. He is the author of “A Faith that Frees: Catholic Matters for the 21st Century “ and “Being on Fire: Top Ten Essentials of Catholic Faith.” He is the University Chaplain at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania and Sarath Surong, sarath@prysm.us, he/him/his. Sarath is a co-founder of PrYSM, (Providence Youth Student Movement organizes at the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation by centering youth, female, queer, and people of color leadership in our campaigns, our organization, and our communities. PrYSM mobilizes queer Southeast Asian youth, families, and allies to build grassroots power and organize collectively for social justice).

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education


Monday, February 5
12:30-2 PM, Hogan Suite A
3rd Annual MLK Book Read: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is excited to announce the 3rd annual MLK Winter Book Read. The selected book is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity and Inclusion


Monday February 5
5-6 pm, Hogan Suite A
Holy Cross League of United Latin American Citizens (HCLULAC)

Reception to introduce HCLULAC to the Holy Cross Community

Sponsored by: Multicultural Peer Educators


Monday, February 5
4 & 8 PM, Seelos Theatre
Film screenings: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks tells the story of Henrietta Lacks (RenĂ©e Elise Goldsberry), an African-American woman whose cells were used to create the first immortal human cell line. Told through the eyes of her daughter, Deborah Lacks (Oprah Winfrey), the film chronicles her search, aided by journalist Rebecca Skloot (Rose Byrne), to learn about the mother she never knew and to understand how the unauthorized harvesting of Lacks’ cancerous cells in 1951 led to unprecedented medical breakthroughs, changing countless lives and the face of medicine forever. It’s a story of medical arrogance and triumph, race, poverty and deep friendship between the unlikeliest of people.

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity and Inclusion


Tuesday, February 6
7-9 PM, Hogan Ballroom
Jelani Cobb, BSU Keynote Speaker

"The Half Life of Freedom: Race & Justice in America Today." Cobb teaches in the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He is also a staff writer at The New Yorker, where he has penned a remarkable series of articles about race, the police, and injustice. His articles include “The Anger in Ferguson,” “Murders in Charleston,” and “What We Talk About When We Talk About Reparations.” He is also the recipient of the 2017 Walter Bernstein Award from the Writer’s Guild of America for his investigative series Policing the Police, which aired on PBS Frontline in 2016.

Sponsored by: Black Student Union

 


Thursday, February 8
7:30 PM, Brooks Concert Hall
Silkroad Ensemble in Concert

Sponsored by: Arts Transcending Borders


Monday, February 12
4:30 PM, Rehm Library

Race, Poverty, and the Criminal Justice System: Lessons Learned From Wrongful Conviction Cases
Since 1989, over 2,100 men and women have been exonerated for crimes they did not commit. They served a total of 18,590 years. Although each of their stories is unique, their collective experience reveals the hard truths about the criminal justice system and its treatment of race and class. Tricia Bushnell, director of the Midwest Innocence Project, discusses the known causes of wrongful convictions, policies and solutions to prevent the conviction of the innocent, and our social obligation to change the system and prevent future injustice.

Sponsored by: Peace and Conflict Studies; McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture


Tuesday, February 13
4:30 PM, Rehm Library
Inaugural Carter G. Woodson Lecture in Africana Studies - "Patrice Lumumba, African Americans, and the Postcolonial Congo"

Speaker is Ira Dworkin (English, Texas A&M), author of Congo Long Song: African American Culture and the Crisis of the Colonial State (UNC Press, 2017). Forhis talk, Dworkin will build upon his recent book, Congo Love Song, and discuss how Patrice Lumumba, the first Prime Minister of an independent Congo, informed the work of leaders like Malcom X. Lumumba only served months in office before being assassinated in 1961 but he continues to galvanize African American artists and activists in ways that resonate across Africa and the global African diaspora.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies


Thursday February 15
8:00 am - 6:30 pm, Henry M. Hogan Campus Center  402(03)
Black History 101 Mobile Museum

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education


Thursday, February 15
7:30 PM, Rehm Library
Writing Africa Today: On the Intersection Between Truth, Justice and Reality in Contested Spaces

Prize-winning Zimbabwean author Petina Gappah writes critically about the government, social and criminal justice issues, and human rights work in sub-Saharan Africa. She is author of the collection of short stories called "Elegy for Easterly," winner of the Guardian First Book Award, as well as a novel, "The Book of Memory," and another short story collection called "Rotten Row."

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture; Africana Studies; Center for Interdisciplinary Studies


Thursday, February 15
7:00 PM, Hogan Center Ballroom
The Vagina Monologues

The Vagina Monologues is an acclaimed play written by Eve Ensler regarding different aspects of a woman's like including relationships, abuse, birth, and self discovery. Holy Cross' annual production is run and performed by students every year to commemorate V-Day, an organization working to end violence against women and girls.

Sponsored by: Feminist Forum


Monday, February 19
5-8 PM,
Silent Dinner/ASL Mass

Sponsored by: ASL


February Monday, 19 - Friday, Feb. 23
Immigration/Migration/Refugee issues week

Sponsored by: Social Justice Coalition


Wednesday, February 21
10 AM - 12 PM, Hogan 320
Creating an Inclusive Campus: Skills & Practice

A faculty and staff workshop. Participants will develop the skills to be active bystanders & effective allies to historically marginalized communities. Additional dates: March 16 & April 17.

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity and Inclusion


Wednesday, February 21
4:30 PM, Rehm Library or Smith Labs 154
In Pursuit of Brown Women: Creating Our Tribe

Sponsored by: ASTD


Thursday, February 22
7:30 PM, Rehm Library
Gish Jen: Vocation of the Writer

Gish Jen’s nonfiction title, “The Girl at the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap” (Knopf, 2017) is a provocative and important study of the different ideas Easterners and Westerners have about the self and society and what this means for current debates in art, education, geopolitics, and business. She has published short work in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, and dozens of other periodicals and anthologies. Her work has appeared in "The Best American Short Stories" four times, including "The Best American Short Stories of the Century," edited by John Updike.

Sponsored by: Creative Writing, History; Political Science; Office of Diversit and Inclsuion; Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies;


Friday, February 23
6-9 pm, Mechanics Hall
"The Golden Year" 50 years of the Black Student Union through Fashion

We take a look at the fifty years of the first and original MSO (Multicultural Student Organization), through the colors of Black, White, Red, Brown & Gold!

Sponsored by: Black Student Union


Monday, February 26
4:30 - 6PM, Hogan 519
DACA (Immigration)

Campus Conversations: Social Justice and Solidarity - How Then Shall We Live? is  a four part series aimed to address complex societal issues impacting our sense of identity, security, and freedom. These dialogues continue the larger conversations happening at both national and international levels around social movements, social media, and economic/political turmoil.The goal of the series is to offer an informative, balanced, and multi-perspective response to the issues addressed by inviting members of the campus community and external community to speak from their personal and/or professional viewpoint. The panels will include a combination of students, faculty, alumni, activists, and civic leaders. Being guided by our Jesuit values and principles, what is our obligation and responsibility as we teach, mentor, model, and inspire our students to live lives of service and leadership?

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education


Sunday - Wednesday February 25-28
12 noon - 7 pm, Hogan 1 lobby/Dinand Hall
11th Annual White Ribbon Campaign to prevent Gender Based Violence

The White Ribbon Campaign is an international effort to engage all people and men and boys in particular to take a stand against gender based violence. We are urging everyon to wear our white pins or bracelets during the month of March to show solidarity withe the survivors of such violence.

Sponsored by: Male Involvement Coalition (MIC)


Wednesday, February 28
5:30-7:30 PM, Levis Browsing Room, Dinand
Sustaining Ourselves: Courageous Self-Care

Social justice activists often experience burn out. This interactive workshop will help participants understand the importance of self-care, while also building the skills to develop meaningful and sustainable self-care practices. By utilizing a confidential and safe space, participants will be able to share challenges and successes in the service of supporting and empowering each other. Workshop is for students, who should RSVP ahead of time. Additional dates: April 19.

Sponsored by: Office of Diversity and Inclusion & Counseling Center

 

Thursday, March 15
TBD, Location TBD
Race and Wealth

Lecture by Kasey Henricks (University of Tennessee)

Sponsored by: Sociology Department


Monday, March 19
5-8 PM,
Silent Dinner/ASL Mass

Sponsored by: ASL


March Monday 19 – Saturday 24
Unity Week: Bridging the Gap

Through performances, dialogue, and fun activities, this weeklong event brings our community together and challenges us to ask more.

Sponsored by: Office of Student Involvement, Student Government Association


Tuesday, March 20
7:00PM, Rehm Library
Andrea James

Andrea James  is the Founder of Families for Justice as Healing, author of Upper Bunkies Unite: And Other Thoughts On the Politics of Mass Incarceration, a 2015 Soros Justice Fellow, and recipient of the 2016 RFK Human Rights award.
Andrea worked within the criminal justice system for more than 25 years, from her days as a youth worker, to her work as a criminal defense attorney. In 2009 she was sentenced to serve a 24-month federal prison sentence. After a lifetime of work seeking justice on behalf of disenfranchised people, she was stunned at what she encountered upon entering the federal prison system as an incarcerated person. Andrea uses her experience to raise awareness of the affect of incarceration of women on themselves, their children and communities, and to raise awareness of the need to shift from a criminal legal system to a system focused on human justice.
http://justiceashealing.org/meet-the-founder/

Sponsored by: Rehm Library Fund


Weds., March 21
7:30 PM, Fenwick Theatre
Lecture: Legendary dancer/choreographer Bill T. Jones

Sponsored by: Arts Transcending Borders

 

Monday, March 26
4:30 PM,
Dr. Alberto Ledesma, UC Berkley

Alberto Ledesma, author of DIARY OF A RELUCTANT DREAMER ("Drawing on a mix of prose, sketches, and other drawings that commemorates his emergence as a “critical cartoonist” to match his work in literary critical theory, the author describes his long years “underground” as the undocumented child of undocumented immigrants from Mexico, a “dreamer” who wanted nothing more than to go to college and have a chance at success.")

Sponsored by: Latin American and Latino Studies Department, English Department and McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture


Monday, March 26
4:30 - 6PM, Hogan 519

Patriotism, Protest, or Resistance (systemic oppression and freedom of speech
Campus Conversations: Social Justice and Solidarity - How Then Shall We Live? is  a four part series aimed to address complex societal issues impacting our sense of identity, security, and freedom. These dialogues continue the larger conversations happening at both national and international levels around social movements, social media, and economic/political turnmoil.The goal of the series is to offer an informative, balanced, and multi-perspective response to the issues addressed by inviting members of the campus community and external community to speak from their personal and/or professional viewpoint. The panels will include a combination of students, faculty, alumni, activists, and civic leaders. Being guided by our Jesuit values and principles, what is our obligation and responsibility as we teach, mentor, model, and inspire our students to live lives of service and leadership?

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education


Tuesday, March 27
7:30 PM, Rehm Library

Contemporary Global Antisemitism as the Rejection of the Other: Implications for Human Rights and Democratic Principles
Charles Asher Small, director of the Institute for the Study of Global Antisemitism and Policy (SGAP), and senior research scholar at the Moshe Dayan Centre for Middle East and African Studies, Tel Aviv University, will speak on anti-Semitism in the 21st century. Supported by the Kraft-Hiatt Fund for Jewish-Christian Understanding.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture


Tuesday, April 3
7:30 PM, Brooks Concert Hall
Martha Redbone's Bonehill: The Concert

Sponsored by: Arts Transcending Borders


Wednesday, April 4
4:30 PM, Rehm Library
Activist Leader Corinne Kumar to Speak on Human Rights in the Global South

Corinne Kumar is Secretary General of El Taller International, an international NGO committed to women’s human rights, sustainable development, and both North-South and South-South exchange and dialogue across diverse cultures and civilizations. A philosopher, poet, human rights theoretician and activist, she is editor of two human rights journals, Sangarsh and The Quilt, and has written and spoken extensively on refugees, violence against women, militarization, and the dominant human rights discourse, critiquing it from a gender and Global South perspective.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture


Wednesday April 4
6-8 PM, Hogan Ballroom
9th Annual Womens' Appreciation Banquet

We will be honoring four women, (faculty, administrators & staff), who have supported our members and deserve recognition and appreciation. We have been doing this event over the past eight years and is our premier event!

Sponsored by: Male Involvement Coalition (MIC)


Tuesday, April 17
5-8 PM,
ASL Banquet

Sponsored by: ASL


Thursday, April 19
4:30 PM, Rehm Library
Jews, Intersectionality and Contemporary Anti-Semitism

Katya Gibel Mevorach, professor of anthropology and American studies at Grinnell College, will speak about anti-Semitism in the 21st century, with a focus on intersectionality.

Sponsored by: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture


Monday, April 30
4:30 - 6PM, Hogan 519
Assessing the Dream : Progress or Retrenchment?(50 yrears after King)

Campus Conversations: Social Justice and Solidarity - How Then Shall We Live? is  a four part series aimed to address complex societal issues impacting our sense of identity, security, and freedom. These dialogues continue the larger conversations happening at both national and international levels around social movements, social media, and economic/political turnmoil.The goal of the series is to offer an informative, balanced, and multi-perspective response to the issues addressed by inviting members of the campus community and external community to speak from their personal and/or professional viewpoint. The panels will include a combination of students, faculty, alumni, activists, and civic leaders. Being guided by our Jesuit values and principles, what is our obligation and responsibility as we teach, mentor, model, and inspire our students to live lives of service and leadership?

Sponsored by: Office of Multicultural Education

 

*** Registration Require. More information to follow up via campus emails

SPRING 2018: DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE PROGRAMMING SPONSORS

Africana Studies; American Sign Language/Deaf Studies; Arts Transcending Borders; Black Student Union; Black Student Union; Center for Interdisciplinary Studies ; Counseling Center; Creative Writing Center; English Department; Feminist Forum; Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies; History Department; Jane Doe Inc. ; Latin American and Latino Studies; Male Involvement Coalition; McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture; Multicultural Peer Educators; Office of Diversity and Inclusion; Office of Multicultural Education; Peace and Conflict Studies; Political Science; Rehm Library Fund; Social Justice Coalition; Student Government Association; Theater/Dance Department;