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Requirements

Requirements for majors in the classes of 2017, 2018 and 2019. Majors must take at least 10 courses in mathematics above Mathematics 133 or 135. The foundation consists of Math 134 or 136 (Calculus 2), Math 241 (Multivariable Calculus), Math 242 (Principles of Analysis), Math 243 (Algebraic Structures), and Math 244 (Linear Algebra), which are required. In addition to the required courses, majors must take five elective mathematics courses numbered above 300. At least one of these must be a project course. Majors in the class of 2017 must complete at least one course from three of the following four areas: Analysis, Algebra, Geometry/Topology, Applied Mathematics/Statistics. Majors in the classes of 2018 and 2019 must complete at least two courses from the areas of Analysis, Algebra, and Geometry/Topology, plus at least one course from the area of Applied Mathematics/Statistics. The course listings that follow show which regular upper-level mathematics courses fall within each of the areas, and majors will consult with their academic advisers no later than the end of their second year to plan their major course selections with this requirement in mind.

Requirements for majors in the classes of 2020 and later. Majors must take at least 10 courses offered by the mathematics and computer science department. The foundation consists of Math 134 or 136 (Calculus 2), Math 241 (Multivariable Calculus), Math 243 (Algebraic Structures), and Math 244 (Linear Algebra), which are required. Majors must also take the upper-level courses Math 351 (Modern Algebra 1) and Math 361 (Real and Abstract Analysis 1). In addition to the required courses, majors must take four elective courses, at least three of which must be mathematics courses numbered above 300. Majors may take Computer Science 131, or any 200-level mathematics course numbered above 220 as one of their elective courses. At least one elective must be a project course. Math 110, Math 120, Math 133, Math 135 and Math 220 do not count toward the major.

Project Courses. In these courses, in place of a final exam, students work on a substantial project leading to a written report and an oral presentation. These projects provide majors with independent learning experiences, where students either investigate some topic using the tools and concepts studied in the course or explore mathematical topics beyond those covered in the course. Majors are encouraged to take advantage of the close student-faculty contact afforded by upper-division seminars, independent study, and departmental honors, which permit students to explore topics of mutual interest to students and faculty that are not part of the regular course offerings. Also, throughout the curriculum, in courses and in independent work, students are able to explore and utilize the growing relationship between mathematics and computing.